Cassidy Russell is an Atlanta-based artist. She received an MFA in printmaking from Savannah College of Art and Design and a BFA in printmaking from the University of Notre Dame, where she was awarded the statewide Efromyson Emerging Artist Award. She has worked for multiple design companies and letterpress shops - including Hatch Show Print in Nashville and Gilah Press + Design in Baltimore. Her studio practice includes embroidery on paper, collage, and installation addressing the ways we try to hide things, looking at human imperfection and the difference between what we show to others and what we withhold.

Cassidy’s work is in the Love Library Special Collection of Artist Books as well as private collections across the country. Her designs have been featured by Hatch Show Print, the Country Music Hall of Fame, Runner’s World Magazine, Women’s Running Magazine, and Trail Runner Magazine. Additionally, she has been recognized nationally for her performance as an improvisational actor. Cassidy was named the 2014 & 2016 Best Emerging Artist in Creative Loafing’s Best of Atlanta. Her work is currently represented by Whitespace Gallery.

 


ARTIST STATEMENT

My work focuses on the ways we try to hide things, looking at human imperfection and the difference between what we show to others and what we withhold. We attempt to present something perfect - something attractive. I make physical the difference between that facade and what lies behind it, using the domestic - references to architecture, quilting, china patterns, curtains, wallpaper - as a psychological portrait.

My works on paper are printed, dyed, and hand-embroidered. Once a hole is punched into paper or a mark is stitched, it is impossible to remove the memory of it. Every event leaves a mark, and much as we try to hide the things we view as imperfections or flaws, it is impossible to erase them completely. The surfaces of the work reflect these attempts: to embellish and make appealing, to mend and cover, to patch over with something different and beautiful. The final pieces act as remnants of action, as palimpsests, where the act of repair becomes more important than the repairs themselves.